Does early childhood education enhance parental school involvement in second grade?: Evidence from Midwest Child-Parent Center Program


Journal article


Nishank Varshney, Sangyoo Lee, Judy A Temple, Arthur J Reynolds
Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 117, 2020, p. 105317


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APA
Varshney, N., Lee, S., Temple, J. A., & Reynolds, A. J. (2020). Does early childhood education enhance parental school involvement in second grade?: Evidence from Midwest Child-Parent Center Program. Children and Youth Services Review, 117, 105317.

Chicago/Turabian
Varshney, Nishank, Sangyoo Lee, Judy A Temple, and Arthur J Reynolds. “Does Early Childhood Education Enhance Parental School Involvement in Second Grade?: Evidence from Midwest Child-Parent Center Program.” Children and Youth Services Review 117 (2020): 105317.

MLA
Varshney, Nishank, et al. “Does Early Childhood Education Enhance Parental School Involvement in Second Grade?: Evidence from Midwest Child-Parent Center Program.” Children and Youth Services Review, vol. 117, 2020, p. 105317.


Abstract
 This paper examines the impact on parent involvement in second grade in the Midwest Child-Parent Centers (MCPC), a high-quality preschool-to-third-grade school reform model. A new focus of research on early childhood programs is understanding how early childhood learning gains can be sustained. Two-generation programs that provide diverse family services may be one approach. The MCPC expansion was implemented for a cohort of over 2000 Chicago and Saint Paul students beginning in preschool. Based on a comparison of the program and usual-service comparison groups matched at the school level via propensity scores, ratings were obtained for a subset of the sample by teachers and parents on parent involvement in school in second grade. After accounting for potential attrition bias via multiple imputation and propensity score weighting, results indicated that MCPC participation was associated with significantly higher parent involvement in school at the end of second grade both in the aggregate sample (Effect Size = 0.19 SD) and in Chicago (ES = 0.24). Differences in Saint Paul, however, were small (ES = 0.15) and not statistically significant. Robustness testing using different model specifications revealed similar results. Implications for assessing and sustaining early childhood learning gains are discussed with a focus on recognizing that parental involvement is an integral component of high-quality programs. 

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